Genre Miniatures

Critics have often compared Leonid Yacobson's choreographic genre scenes to books of poetry: they are brimming over with a multitude of moods, images, and styles.

Leonid Yacobson started staging his very first miniatures back in 1925, when he was still a senior student at the Vaganova Ballet School (currently the Vaganova Russian Ballet Academy); later on, he began to create genre scenes that starred the leading dancers of the Kirov and Bolshoi Theatres.

Critics have often compared Leonid Yacobson's choreographic genre scenes to books of poetry: they are brimming over with a multitude of moods, images, and styles.

The 'Russian Cycle' of Yacobson's miniatures  began with the Choreographic Miniatures performance at the Kirov (currently Mariinsky) Theatre in 1959 (this show later gave Yacobson's company its name). Later on, the Choreographic Miniatures were adapted into a movie, filmed at the Leningrad television studio in 1960. Pungent and full of character, the ballet show began with a triptych, which initially comprised the Troika, Baba Yaga, and Snegurochka miniatures. Later on, the choreographer expanded this miniature series with two more dance sketches, based on music by Igor Stravinsky: Dead Tsarevna — a mini-ballet where the danseur touches a chord within the audience by carrying his partner in his arms throughout the entire dance, time and again trying to wake her up or gently lulling her to sleep like a child — and Firebird, where the Russian fairy-tale prince, Ivan Tsarevich, hunts down and captures the elusive Firebird, rumoured to bring good luck; the bird frantically struggles for her life, but eventually gives in.

After Leonid Yacobson's passing, his successor Askold Makarov added two more miniatures to the cycle: the toy-like, emphatically gaudy Russian Souvenir, and The Village Don Juan, where the choreographer used audience interaction — one of Yacobson's favourite techniques. Today, the performance features various miniatures that have been staged throughout the years. Each of them is eye-catching and passionate, and all together they merge into an emotionally charged torrent of one-of-a-kind, awe-inspiring visual images.

Information

Snegurochka (Music by Sergey Prokofiev)
Baba Yaga (Music by Modest Mussorgsky)
Blind Girl (Music by Manuel Ponce and Jascha Heifetz)
The Village Don Juan (Music by Yury Zaristky)
Pulcinella (Music by Sergei Rachmaninoff)
The Gossips (Music by Sico Aranov)
The Boot-Licker (Music by Vladimir Tsytovich)
Stronger than Death (Music by Isaac Schwartz)
Encounter (Music by T. Kravchenko)
Viennese Waltz (Music by Johann Strauss)
Troika (Music by Igor Stravinsky)

Choreography by Leonid Yacobson

The show premiered on JANUARY 2, 1971

Ticket prices:
from 300 to 2500 rubles